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THE PHLEGRAEAN LAKES

Campi Flegrei literally means “Burning Fields”, an ancient name given to the area that today includes the towns of Pozzuoli, Bacoli, Baia, Monte di Procida and Quarto, situated just a few kilometres distance from central Naples, Italy.

Throughout this fascinating territory the force of nature combines the beauty of its sea and lakes, to the mysterious charm of this volcanic land.

The Phlegraean zone is full of valuable and intricate evidence regarding past Greek and Roman traditions.

The lakes of  “Miseno”, “Averno”, “Fusaro”, “Lucrino” and “Patria” still characterize today the Phlegraean-Domitian coastline parting from the West of Naples and reaching the “Volturno” river’s mouth.

The use of the Phlegraean lakes in Roman times as reservoirs was quite common, cultivating mussels and fish produce.

The exploitation of the precious environmental resources gave life to sumptuous banquets that were held regularly in luxurious and elegant villas present throughout the area.

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@MUSEO E REAL BOSCO DI CAPODIMONTE

on display until NOVEMBER 15th 2020

Vincenzo Gemito was a figurative sculptor born in Naples in 1852. Although considered as the most important Italian sculptor of late 19th century his origins were not so promising. He was a street-orphan adopted by a poor artisan and already assisting the sculptor Emanuele Caggiano aged nine. Gemito moved on to work with Stanislao Lista. After acquiring skills modelling clay and wax he independently exhibited a sculpture at Belle Arti di Napoli  Il Giocatore” (The Card Player) a Neapolitan urchin studying a hand of playing cards.  The bronze-cast of the same work was purchased for the Capodimonte collectionVincenzo Gemito was sixteen years old…

Vincenzo Gemito

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GETTING AROUND NAPLES

The Linea 3M minibus runs daily circular routes – 7 am to 8.05 pm

  Ticket Fees: ANM one-way Urban-zone tickets cost 1.10 euro

  Major info: www.anm.it

Linea 3M – Three Museum Bus line connects:

  Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte – Catacombe San Gennaro – Museo Archeologico MANN 

(ACTIVE FROM SEPTEMBER 12th 2020)

  Circular Route:  Museo e Real Bosco di Capodimonte (stops: Porta Miano & Porta Piccola)

– via Capodimonte – Catacombe San Gennaro – corso Amedeo di Savoia – via S. Teresa degli Scalzi –  via Pessina – via Conte di Ruvo – via Costantinopoli – MANN (P.za Museo Archeologico Nazionale)

Daily departures:

07:00 – 07:15 – 07:30 – 07:45

08:00 – 08:15 – 08:30 – 08:45

09:00 – 09:15 – 09:30 – 09:45

10:00 – 10:15 – 10:30 – 10:45

11:00 – 11:15 – 11:30 – 11:45

12:00 – 12:15 – 12:30 – 12:45

13:00 – 13:20 – 13:45

14:05 – 14:30 – 14:50

15:15 – 15:35

16:00 – 16:20 – 16:45

17:05 – 17:30 – 17:50

18:15 – 18:35

19:00 – 19:20

* 20:05

* FINAL RUN FROM From Real Bosco di Capodimonte to piazza Museo Archeologico Nazionale MANN

CONTACT CENTRE ANM CALL:  800-639525

 

Source © My Country magazine – Naples, Italy

October 2020 – page 14

 

Rosa Parks

VISIT NAPLES

Palazzo Reale di Napoli

@ PALAZZO REALE DI NAPOLI

The magnificent Royal Palace Palazzo Reale di Napoli is situated within the heart of Naples and has been frequently highlighted by My Country magazine.

Well, we are back again this month with some latest updates

The Royal Palace houses the national library Biblioteca di Napoli – transferred here in 1925, but seriously damaged due to WWII bombings and the subsequent military occupation. The library holds a fascinating collection of documents including a large collection of papyrus scrolls from the ancient Roman archaeological site of Herculaneum – Ercolano (Villa dei Pisoni destroyed by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 AD and original documents written by Alfonso d’Aragona (1455); the composer Giuseppe Verdi and major 19th century composers including Gioachino Rossini.

  • The beautiful halls and historic apartments and studio’s with paintings and tapestries… a blast from the past.

The statues dominating the external western side of the palace facing the main square of Piazza del Plebiscito portray the rulers of the Kingdom of Naples dating from the 10th-century and are positioned in chronological order. The Palace was enriched by Murat and his wife Caroline Bonaparte with rich Neoclassic decor and furnishings during the Napoleonic occupation. It is notable that no statue along the façade of the royal palace Palazzo Reale refers to the Bourbon reign – not even Carlo di Borbone, engraved as Carlo III – Charles III the King of Spain.

  • LATEST INFORMATION for visitors:
  • All visitors are obliged to follow indicated routes, to be equipped with masks and to maintain a safety distance of at least 1.2 metres from others. Current anti-Covid 19 entrance methods are placing groups of up to 8 visitors a time for a maximum of 50 visitors per hour.
  • Admission tickets are available directly at the ticket-office/info-point – but why not avoid the crowds! Reserve your tickets without added costs online here  https:// www.coopculture.it/
  • The garden “Giardino Romantico” and the “Cortili” Courtyards are open to the public without charge from 9 am to 7 pm except Wednesdays.
  • The Guided Tours of the garden “Giardini Pensili” (as highlighted last March) are temporarily suspended until further notice. Bag storage and the use of audio guides are also temporarily suspended.

Fees: Standard admission – Euro 6,00; Reduced Euro 3,00; 18 – 25 yrs Euro 2,00; Under 18’s – Free    Opening times: Daily from 9 am to 8 pm except Wednesdays. Last admission by 7 pm.   Info: +39 081 580 8255

APP “ENJOY ALL PALAZZO REALE”

TOUR the MAIN WORKS: of Palazzo Reale, the library Biblioteca Nazionale di Napoli “Vittorio Emanuele III”, the theatre Teatro San Carlo and the castle Maschio Angioino/Castel Nuovo

by Smartphone or Tablet – So,  scan the QR-code and Buon Viaggio!

ALMOST HOME – THE ROSA PARKS HOUSE PROJECT – RYAN MENDOZA

SEPTEMBER 15th 2020 to JANUARY 6th 2021

@ PALAZZO REALE DI NAPOLI   1, Piazza del Plebiscito

Rosa Parks

The royal palace of Naples Palazzo Reale di Napoli is currently hosting the free installation within the central courtyard – “Almost Home – The Rosa Parks House Project” created by the US artist Ryan Mendoza.

So, who was Rosa Parks?  Rosa Parks was an Afro-American activist who became an important symbol during the struggle for civil rights in the USA during the 1950’s.  She refused to give her seat to a white passenger on a segregated bus in Alabama in 1955 and was arrested for civil disobedience.  The incident led to a one-year long bus boycott throughout the city.

After her famous act, Parks became known as the “Mother of the Civil Rights Movement” whilst losing her job and enduring death threats for years to come.  She passed away in Detroit October 2005 – aged 92.

Rosa Parks house was originally located in the city of Detroit and was saved from demolition after her niece Rhea McCauley bought it from Detroit city authorities.  She then tried to raise funds to renovate the then long-abandoned structure. She approached Mendoza on 2016 after struggling to find institutional support.  Mendoza purchased and transported the house to his back-garden in Berlin in the same year.

Ryan Mendoza was born in New York in 1971 and created the projects “The White House” (2015), “The Invitation” (2016) and the renowned “The Rosa Parks House Project” (2017).

His art projects and paintings have been displayed in numerous museums and galleries throughout Europe, including – White Cube/ London, Galerie Lelong, Paris / New York, and Museo Madre/Italy Naples.

The 2017 award-winning documentary directed by Mendoza’s wife Fabia “The White house” offers an ample insight regarding Mendoza’s artistic activities and tells the story of The Rosa Parks House Project.

The Rosa Parks House Project may be considered as keeping alive not only the memory of Rosa Parks, but of all of those who lived there – during a dramatically conflictual historical moment of American history – with an identity unfortunately still under discussion today…

Entrance to the installation is without charge – on display until January 6th 2021

“Almost Home – The Rosa Parks House Project” is promoted by: Fondazione Morra Greco, Regione Campania, Direzione regionale Musei Campania

INFO: +39 081 19349740    info@fondazionemorragreco.com    http://www.fondazionemorragreco.com

The Rosa Parks House Project at Palazzo Reale di Napoli

© My Country magazine

OCTOBER 2020 – pages 12-13

My Country magazine - October 2020 - page 12

 

San Gennaro ampoule

St. Januarius  SAN GENNARO

the Saint and the Miracle…

Throughout the year the city of Naples celebrates over fifty different Saints

– but the Saint Januarius San Gennaro may be considered as the most important.

If you are new here to Naples, then the history and traditions regarding San Gennaro

together with the alleged miracle may just be worth learning about.

 

Three yearly events take place dedicated to the patron Saint San Gennaro and are not only religious celebrations but mass events which today continue to boast an enormous public participation.  The annual dates are held on the Saturday before the first Sunday of May, on September 19th and December 16th and celebrated in central Naples at the “Duomo” Cathedral of Naples, Museo del Tesoro di San Gennaro and at the Sanctuary of San Gennaro where it is believed he was beheaded – Santuario di San Gennaro all Solfatara, situated at Pozzuoli.

The traditional procession was originally established aiming to end the plague and passed from the Solfatara arriving to the Amphitheatre Anfiteatro Flavio to return to the statue of San Gennaro held within the Sanctuary.  The “miracle” has been regularly recorded since year 1389…

Regarding “the Miracle”, the faithful and not only gather in Naples to witness the mystifying liquefaction of what is claimed to San Gennaro’s blood.  Numerous legends depict that if the blood conserved within the glass ampoule fails to liquefy, then disaster will hit Naples.  Coincidentally or not, disasters have actually struck on several occasions when the liquefaction failed – including the plague epidemic that struck Pozzuoli and the earthquake dated 1980 creating over 3,000 victims.

the Museum…

The astounding museum Museum of the Treasure of Saint Gennaro – Museo del Tesoro di San Gennaro was founded in 2003 due to a project supported by European funds, by local institutions and private companies and is situated next to the Duomo of Naples.  The Treasure (il Tesoro) and vast collections of art works held within this museum covering over 700 square metres have been estimated as richer than the Crown Jewels belonging none other than to Queen Elizabeth II.  The untouched collection of works is guarded by an ancient institution – the Deputation of the Royal Chapel and Treasure of San Gennaro – which was established back in 1527 and is an organisation that still safeguards its preservation today.  Two ampoules are held within the main altar of the Royal Chapel.  The Royal Chapel is part of the Cathedral but independent.  Exhibits include jewellery, fabrics, paintings, frescoes, the renowned “mitre” –the Bishop’s hat embedded with diamonds, rubies and emeralds and a priceless collection of numerous silver busts – dating from 1305.

MUSEO DEL TESORO DI SAN GENNARO   149, via Duomo – Napoli

OPENING TIMES: Mondays to Saturdays: 9.30-5.30;  Sundays: 9.30-1.30

CONTACT:  +39 081 294980/338 3361771   info@museosangennaro.it

TICKET FEES:   Standard Euro 5; Guided Tour Euro 12;

2 Museum’sMuseo del Tesoro di San Gennaro including entrance voucher to Museo Civico Filangieri Euro 8.

View the QR code to download the museum’s multimedia guide app. without charge at the ticket office (situated at the entrance)

Online Ticket Office Info and Reservations:

+39 081 294980/ 366 1319973  prenotazioni@museosangennaro.it

Full details and any time changes will be updated with official notices on http://www.museosangennaro.it

Discover San Gennaro at:

Duomo di Napoli Cathedral Santa Maria Assunta 147, via Duomo Naples;

Santuario di San Gennaro all Solfatara 8 via San Gennaro alla Solfatara and the Catacombs Catacombe di San Gennaro 13 via Capodimonte Naples.

(For the complete article – read more on pages 8 to 11 – September 2020 edition)

 

source © My Country magazine – September 2020

Photographs courtesy: Marcello Erardi – Napoli vista attraverso gli scatti fotografici

 

Murat – from humble origins to the King of Naples

So, who was Joachim Murat?
Murat was born from humble origins in southwest France – La Bastide-Fortunière (known as Labastide-Murat today) on March 25th 1767. Considered as “The great military man” it was obviously thanks to his so-called “bravery” that he steadily climbed the military ladder. Murat commanded the cavalry of the French Egyptian expedition of 1798 and became Marshal and “First Horseman of Europe” in May 1804, participating in all of Napoleon’s campaigns including Austerlitz, Jena, Eylau and Borodino (1812).

Murat was considered as a brave soldier by Napoleon even though often too impulsive. He married Napoleon’s youngest sister Caroline Bonaparte after returning from Egypt in 1800 bearing four children – Achilles, Laetizia, Lucien and Louise, and became prince during March 1806 – before arriving to Naples. Napoleon nominated Murat as King of Naples after ousting the Bourbons two years later in 1808. Murat was noted as a charismatic cavalry officer but also as “The Dandy King” thanks to his flamboyant style of dressing.

But what did Murat – the new sovereign actually do to win favour of the population and take place as one of the statues at the entrance of the Royal Palace Palazzo Reale di Napoli?
Well, apart from generally giving priority to the populations most critical conditions and attempting to raise the kingdom’s economy, Murat also tried to restore the public debt, forgave the “deserters” and abolished executions. After the foundation of the Banco delle due Sicilie he not only declared that his own expenses would not influence state income but confiscated all ecclesiastical property. These confiscations clearly did not prove popular at all to the clergy – and things did not improve when he introduced the Napoleonic Code which included the legalisation of divorce for the first time in Italy. Murat also dealt with education involving engineering, bibliography, professorships and public works.

As Murat became more and more “Neapolitan” and the kingdom was less tied to France, Napoleon continued his project. Murat signed the pact of alliance with Austria after fighting for Napoleon in the last battles of Dresden and Leipzig but was convinced to keep the Neapolitan crown. During March 1815 he invaded the papal state fighting against the Austrian army who had the upper hand. Murat was defeated and the Bourbons returned to the throne. Murat dreamt not only the Kingdom of Naples but Italy – asking the entire population to turn against foreign power to then issue the proclamation of Rimini.
A number of his troops convinced him to organize another expedition to regain control of Naples – leaving Ajaccio in September 1815 – expected to land in Salerno, Napoli.
It is believed that bad weather conditions forced him and the expedition to land at the port of Pizzo – situated on the Calabrian Coast. As one of his battalions landed, they handed him over to the Bourbon Gendarmerie who sentenced him to death for treason. His former allies whom he had deserted campaigned for his arrest in Calabria. The dominant castle of Pizzo was where he was imprisoned and then shot – after his last proud words: «Soldats! Faites votre devoir! Droit au coeur mais épargne le visage. Feu!» “Soldiers! Do your duty! Straight to the heart but spare the face. Fire!”

PALAZZO REALE DI NAPOLI My Country magazine recently highlighted the Royal Palace Palazzo Reale di Napoli. It’s a pleasure to take another visit to the Palace, with the magnificent series of statues and of course its garden – Giardino Pensile (pictured right). The National Library was transferred here by 1925, but was damaged due to WWII bombings and the subsequent military occupation. The external statues dominating the western side of the palace facing Piazza del Plebiscito portray the rulers of the Kingdom of Naples dating from the 10th-century and are positioned in chronological order (see this month’s cover page). The Palace was enriched by Murat and his wife Caroline Bonaparte with rich Neoclassic decor and furnishings during the Napoleonic occupation. It is notable that no statue along the façade of Palazzo Reale refers to the Bourbon reign – not even Carlo di Borbone, engraved as Carlo III – Charles III the King of Spain. During the 17th-century the Garden, originally named “Giardino del Belvedere” was enriched and expanded including a large terrace by the wish of Carlo di Borbone, who arrived to Naples in 1734. Known as the “Giardino Pensile a Palazzo Reale” today, the Garden has recently re-opened to the public following reconstruction works, also offering a fantastic view of the unique Gulf – Golfo di Napoli.

 

Source ©My Country magazine – March 2020 (pages 8-9)