PROCIDA

Italy’s Capital of Culture for 2022

Capitale della Cultura 2022

 

Procida has recently been nominated as the Italian Capital of Culture 2022, an important recognition beating 9 other candidates.  The concept for 2022 is represented by the slogan “La cultura non isola” literally meaning “Culture doesn’t isolate” a project following local, national and international dimensions. The “Capitale della Cultura 2022” programme will involve over 50 projects, offering more than 300 days of scheduled events, contemporary exhibitions, festivals and live performances. Numerous events will be hosted by Palazzo D’Avalos – currently open to the public from Thursdays to Sundays (from June 1st to September 30th 2021)

The Charming Island of Procida

Procida is the oldest and smallest of three islands situated just off the coast of Naples, displaying a jagged 16-kilometre coastline of volcanic origin placed between Cape Miseno and the island of Ischia.  Even though the nearby islands of Ischia and Capri may be considered more “popular” as touristic destinations, Procida has a special captivating visual impact with breath-taking landscapes, a calm but also somehow chaotic feeling to the air and basically a “real” atmosphere far away from mass tourism.  Procida is every-day life with locals, colourful narrow streets, churches, lemon groves, orchards, vineyards, traditional scenes of busy fishermen and characteristic shops full of local handicrafts.

 

Procida – the beaches

If you are looking for beaches, Procida has a choice of seven:

Spiaggia della Chiaia (via Pizzaco), Pozzo Vecchio-Spiaggia del Postino (via C. Battisti), Punta Lingua/Asino (via Roma), Marina di Corricella, Spiaggia della Silurenza (Via Roma), Spiaggia di Ciraccio and Spiaggia della Chiaiolella (Lungomare Cristoforo Colombo).

The Marina di Chiaiolella is charmingly characteristic and considered as one of the most popular areas, well equipped for small boats, super sunsets and families.  Chiaiolella is dominated by the medieval fortification “Terra Murata” situated at the highest point of the island and considered as the heart of Procida – obviously worth a visit.

The small fishing harbour (Borgo Marinaio) of Marina di Corricella is absolutely striking for its pastel-coloured architecture – and most probably the most-photographed.

Spiaggia di Chiaia offers calmly low bathing waters situated within a protected bay with 182 worthy steps heading from via Piazzaco.

Pozzo Vecchio – also called “Il Postino beach” is known to be comfortably shady in the mornings and great during late afternoons for stunning sunsets – but not always perfect for easy swimming.

Silurenza is accessible with a brief walk through central via Roma and is recommended for families with younger children.

The Marina di Sancio Cattolico is commonly known as the “Marina Grande” and is the commercial harbour.  Scheduled Hydrofoils and direct Ferry services are available with frequent connections to and from central Naples, Pozzuoli, Monte di Procida (seasonal), and the nearby isles of Capri and Ischia.

Procida – My Recommended Highlights:

  • for History and Art – Terra Murata, Abbazia di San Michele Arcangelo (Abbey), Palazzo Reale D’Avalos, Palazzo Guarracino
  • for Tasty Traditions – Fresh fish and pasta dishes, lemons, Lingua di Procida (sweet pastries), Wines and Limoncello liquors
  • for Gifts and Souvenirs – Handcrafts, Pottery, Ceramics, Hand-made lace and fine embroidery
  • for Nature – Isola di Vivara Natural Oasis
  • for Children – Marina di Chiaiollela, Silurenza, Terra Murata
source: My Country magazine – Naples, Italy

 

THE CURRENT COVID-19 SITUATION IN CAMPANIA, ITALY

JUNE 21/06/2021

 

  • MINIMUM RISK WHITE ZONES

Following various changes regarding Italy’s anti-COVID colour-coded tier system changing from high-risk red zones to orange and yellow, the Campania region (amongst others) will finally be classified as a lowest-risk white zone as of June 21st 2021.  The monitoring report was presented last Friday (June 18th 2021) after being examined by the Italian Government’s COVID-19 taskforce.  All of Italy’s regions and autonomous provinces will now be considered as low risk except for Valle d’Aosta, which is considered as moderate risk – remaining classed as a yellow zone.

The health minister Roberto Speranza signed the latest ordinance thanks to the decrease in infections.  The Campania region has recorded an incidence of infection lower than 50 for the last three weeks.  Both the proportion of Italy’s intensive-care places occupied by COVID19 patients and ordinary hospital-ward beds at a national level are currently at 6%.  No Italian region is currently placed above the critical threshold of 30%.

 

  • NIGHT-TIME CURFEW

One of the major changes when the white zone enters into force will be the end of the night-time curfew – with no restrictions regarding travel to other white zones and no time limits to return home.  Justification is not necessary if travelling nationally but specific restrictions must be respected.

 

  • EUDCC Digital COVID Certificate – GREEN PASS

If travelling throughout national territory you must be in possession of a “Green Pass”.  The “Certificazione Verde” website enables travellers to request the digital certification in English, French and German and is designed to facilitate travel.

In order to claim the Green Pass it is necessary to provide one of the following: certification of full vaccination, details of recovery from COVID19 or a recent test resulting negative.

Consult online: www.cg.gov.it / www.salute.gov.it , Pharmacies or Doctor. The certification is available in both paper and digital versions containing a QR code and is completely free of charge.

The EU Digital COVID Certificate (EUDCC) will allow travel throughout the European Union as from July 1st.

Gatherings remain prohibited and social-distancing remains necessary.

Bars and restaurants will finally be able to remain open without having to respect time restrictions.  Indoor tables are limited to 4 seated guests with the only exception of cohabitants.

 

  • FACE MASKS

The use of protective face masks remains obligatory both indoors and outdoors throughout Italy.

Following numerous debates, the Italian Government plans to drop this obligation but there are still no precise indications.

Changes are expected regarding outdoor use as of June 28th but use will still be necessary in any crowded situations, queues, public transport, bars and restaurants if not seated and indoors.

 

The Italian Higher Health Institute (ISS) president Silvio Brusaferro quoted that the infection curve has resulted amongst the lowest in the EU and many zones have no viral cases with some regions reporting cases coming from abroad.

Chief Health Minister Gianni Rezza commented that the situation is “very good, but the epidemic isn’t over yet”

MY EXHIBITIONS

NAPOLI – CENTRAL NAPLES (MARCH 2021)
Over the years, My Country magazine has had the pleasure to choose from an amazing collection of photographs depicting different views of Naples, created by Marcello Erardi together with the active Facebook page including more than 60,000 photographs and 2,200 albums: Napoli vista attraverso gli scatti fotografici

Photographic exhibition @ Parrocchia di San Giovanni Maggiore, Napoli
For all of those lucky enough to be situated within the heart of Naples Centro storico – then note the photographic exhibition “Il Cristo deposto” – currently on display at the parish of San Giovanni Maggiore – entrance is free-of-charge

Opening times: 9 am to 1 pm and 4 pm to 7 pm
Entrance points: 14, Rampe San Giovanni Maggiore or Largo San Giovanni Maggiore

MARCH 09/03/2021   The colour-coded tier system was updated including higher Covid-19 restrictions last February 21st throughout Italy

Many regions changed classification from lower-risk yellow zones to medium-risk orange zones including Campania, Naples.The Campania region is currently classified as a high-risk red zone, together with Basilicata and Molise.

It is predicted that numerous regions will follow – updating from medium-risk orange to red – considered as a high level of risk with a scenario of maximum severity.

Italy’s health minister Roberto Speranza signed the recent order based upon a weekly report provided by the Higher Health Institute (ISS) involving increasing concerns about widespread circulation of new and more transmissible variants.

The latest Dpcm Ministerial Decree was signed by Speranza and the Prime Minister Draghi on March 2nd 2021 to combat and contain the virus emergency – to be respected from March 6th to April 6th 2021.
The new restrictive measures confirm numerous urgent provisions already in force for containment of contagion throughout the national territory and introduce a number of new measures.
The colour-coded tier system classifying Italy into white, yellow, orange and red zones has been confirmed and will be updated according to levels of risk.

  • Face masks are obligatory – indoors and outdoors. Children under six years of age are exempt.
  • Social-distancing of at least 1-metre is still in act.
  • The travel ban between regions is confirmed until March 27th 2021. Travel motivated by proven work requirements or health reasons is permitted as is returning to one’s residence.
  • The nationwide night-time curfew from 10 pm to 5 am has also been confirmed.
  • All schools within red zones are now closed.
  • Any form of crowding is prohibited.
  • Visiting relatives or friends or travel to second homes is NOT allowed (even within your own municipality)
  • Throughout orange and red zones catering services are suspended but take-away and delivery is permitted until 10 pm. In all areas Bars and Café’s are available for take-away services until 6 pm only.
  • Throughout red zones any retail/commercial activity is suspended except for necessary foodstuffs and Pharmacies.
  • The national State of Emergency has been extended to April 30th 2021.

Please note: Italian authorities may impose, extend or further tighten any restrictions with little-to-no-notice – in response to developments regarding the Covid-19 strain.

Rules of conduct in case of any symptoms or doubts about health conditions:
If you have any symptoms such as fever (over 37.5°), breathing difficulty or coughing – stay at home and limit all contacts.  Do NOT go to the hospital or Doctor but call your local Guardia Medica or contact the regional or toll-free numbers:
Information line from Italy 1500
From abroad +39 02 32008345/ 02 89619015
Campania region 800 90 96 99
Use the national emergency numbers 112/118 only if strictly necessary

© MY COUNTRY MAGAZINE – NAPLES, ITALY (MARCH 2021)

Latest update 09/03/2021

Latest Covid-19 situation in Italy
*updated: March 15th 2021

As expected, the health minister Speranza has signed the latest decree classifying the regions of Lazio, Lombardia, Emilia-Romagna, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Veneto, Piemonte, Puglia, Marche and the province of Trento as high-risk red zones from today March 15th 2021 (Campania and Molise remain classed as red)
The regions of Abruzzo, Calabria, Tuscania, Liguria, Puglia, Sicilia, Umbria, the Aosta valley and province of Bolzano are now classed as medium-risk orange zones. Sardegna remains categorized as the only lowest-risk white zone.
Current restrictions will remain in place until Easter weekend when the the whole country (except Sardegna) will be classed as high-risk red – even though April 3rd, 4th and 5th will supposedly include the possibility to visit relatives or friends – once per day.
Since the Covid-19 pandemic swept over Italy one year ago, over 100,000 people have died – prompting long lockdowns and forming what may be regarded as the worst recession since WWII. Tightened restrictions in force throughout red zones have also ordered all schools to close and obviously residents have been asked to leave home only for necessary reasons.

Over 6.2 million Covid-19 vaccine doses have been administered throughout Italy as of March 12th 2021. It is important to underline that two doses are necessary for the vaccine to be fully effective. So, basically just 1.9 million people in Italy can now be considered as being fully protected against the virus. Obviously this situation and various solutions with a new vaccine programme are at the top-of-the-list – and hopefully a rapid exit from the pandemic.
If you are interested about vaccine news and so much more – then why not take a look at some real details and interesting views from our friend Susan Levenstein MD – “The straight dope on Italian health and medical care” on her active blog www.stethoscopeonrome.com 

(That’s also the frequently highlighted book – Dottoressa An American Doctor in Rome)

My Country magazine

will be updating any useful current information

… for more details follow our Facebook page  www.facebook.com/paesemiomycountry

#StaySafe

 

 

Over the years, My Country magazine has frequently highlighted the charming isle of Procida.

Procida is the oldest and smallest of the three fascinating isles situated on the Gulf of Naples.

 

Read more

THE ITALIAN ANTI-COVID COLOUR SYSTEM

Italy has adopted a three-tier system dividing the nations 20 Regions based on a colour code as follows:

RED – High risk

ORANGE – Medium risk

YELLOW – Low risk

The Campania Region is currently considered as a Yellow Zone (as of January 2021)  In Yellow zones – shops are allowed to open and restaurants and bars can serve customers until 6 pm.

Delivery/Take-away services are allowed after 6 pm.  At last, various museums and monumental complexes are gradually re-opening – many of which offering free or half-price entrance fees

(including the magnificent national archaeological museum of Naples #MANN Museo Archeologico Napoli and the enchanting Park and Museum of Capodimonte – Real Bosco e Museo di Capodimonte

 

THE LATEST JANUARY 2021 DECREE – DCPM

The Italian government has recently passed the latest decree-law including new Covid-19 containment measures with the State of Emergency extended until April 30th 2021.  Four new ordinances were signed by the Italian Minister of Health – Roberto Speranza on January 15th 2021 with measures enforced starting from January 17th.

The breakdown of the Regions are as follows:

Yellow zones: Basilicata, Campania, Molise, Trento, Sardinia, Tuscany

Orange zones:  Abruzzo, Apulia, Calabria, Emilia-Romagna, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Lazio, Liguria, Marche, Veneto, Piedmonte

Red zones:  Bolzano, Lombardia, Sicilia

 

The main changes introduced by the new decree are as follows:

MOBILITY BETWEEN REGIONS

The decree confirms the ban already in force regarding any movements between different Regions and autonomous Provinces – with the exception of proven work requirements, health reasons or situations of necessity.

VISITING PRIVATE HOMES

A maximum of two people may travel to visit another private home once a day and between 5 am and 10 pm.  The two persons travelling may take children under 14 years of age or any disabled or dependent persons who live with them.  It is recommended to use a protective mask if non-cohabiting people are present.

INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL

Italy is maintaining extensive international travel restrictions.  Travellers from the UK have been barred from entry since December 23rd 2020 – unless they are official residents of Italy or travelling for essential reasons that must be declared in writing.  Travellers must present proof of a negative Covid-19 test result taken not other than 72 hours before departure and to take another test upon arrival in Italy.  People arriving from the UK are required to present themselves to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days – regardless of the test results.  This requirement also applies to travellers from all EU countries and all international arrivals (except those from San Marino and the Vatican) and they must complete a self-declaration form prior to arrival.

A new ordinance has been signed on January 18th 2021 to ban flights from Brazil and against entry for those who have transited through Brazil in the last 14 days.

 

THE 3 FUNDAMENTAL RULES

To protect yourself and others from contagion

<•  Always use a mask – indoors and outdoors unless you are alone or with cohabiting persons

<•  Maintain a distance of at least one-metre from other people

<•  Wash your hands frequently with soap and water or alcohol based solutions

 

NATIONWIDE MEASURES include:

Masks MUST be worn in all outdoor and indoor public spaces (Children under six years of age are exempt)

Public transport is limited to operate with a 50-percent capacity

Any form of crowding or gatherings consisting of more than six persons are considered as prohibited

Shopping Centres will remain closed on weekends

The authorities have also confirmed the night time curfew – currently active from 10 pm to 5 am

The travel ban between regions is in act until February 15th 2021

INFO/RULES OF CONDUCT – IN CASE OF SYMPTOMS OR DOUBTS ABOUT HEALTH CONDITIONS

If you have symptoms such as fever (over 37.5°), breathing difficulty or coughing

stay at home and limit all contacts

Do NOT go to the hospital or Doctor but call your medical guard (Guardia Medica) or the regional toll-free numbers:

From Italy – 1500

From abroad – +39 02 32008345/ 02 89619015

Campania region – 800 90 96 99

Contact the emergency numbers 112 or 118 only if strictly necessary.

If you do prove to be subject to “quarantine” isolation measures by testing positive to the Covid-19 virus – then you are strictly prohibited to move from your home/residence.

For detailed information consult your local Embassy, Consulate and the Italian Health board – Ministero della Salute website – with links in English on: salute.gov.it

Please note: Italian authorities may impose, extend or further tighten any restrictions with little-to-no-notice – depending on disease activity and in response to developments regarding the Covid-19 strain

Keep an eye on the My Country magazine’s LATEST UPDATES on www.mycountrymagazine.com and follow our Facebook page on www.facebook.com/paesemiomycountry

PUBLISHED by My Country magazine, Naples- Italy January 20th 2021 – LAST UPDATE January 20th 2021

THE PHLEGRAEAN LAKES

Campi Flegrei literally means “Burning Fields”, an ancient name given to the area that today includes the towns of Pozzuoli, Bacoli, Baia, Monte di Procida and Quarto, situated just a few kilometres distance from central Naples, Italy.

Throughout this fascinating territory the force of nature combines the beauty of its sea and lakes, to the mysterious charm of this volcanic land.

The Phlegraean zone is full of valuable and intricate evidence regarding past Greek and Roman traditions.

The lakes of  “Miseno”, “Averno”, “Fusaro”, “Lucrino” and “Patria” still characterize today the Phlegraean-Domitian coastline parting from the West of Naples and reaching the “Volturno” river’s mouth.

The use of the Phlegraean lakes in Roman times as reservoirs was quite common, cultivating mussels and fish produce.

The exploitation of the precious environmental resources gave life to sumptuous banquets that were held regularly in luxurious and elegant villas present throughout the area.

Read more

Interview with Mr Mariano Moreno – Borboniqua Napoli

 

Before talking about BorboniQua, could you tell us about your background and shoemaking industry experiences?

I have dealt with the footwear and clothing industries as a representative for central and southern Italy since 1979.  I have managed both positioning and sales throughout these areas with brands including Timberland, American footwear, Levis, Allen Edmond’s, Justine boot, Polo Ralf Laurent, Tommy Hilfigher, Clarks and Filson amongst others.  I have been collaborating with different brands for over 15 years to enhance stylistic choices and for production purposes.  I have recently given life to a much-desired project of creating a collection of footwear and accessories entirely “made in Naples” reaching to international markets – BorboniQua Napoli.

Could you tell us about BorboniQua?

The name of our collection BorboniQua is strongly connected to the territory of Naples and of course the Bourbon period from what was then the Kingdom of Naples.

Our creative philosophy contains elements of tradition but also innovation reflected in the same values.

 

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MY TASTE OF NAPLES

So, what is Vino Novello?

A SEASONAL DELIGHT

Like every year, starting from mid-October until the end of November, the so-called Italian “new” wines appear.

Vino Novello is a fresh, sparkling deep-red coloured wine with purple reflections, commonly confused with young wines or recent vintages, that is – wines that have not yet aged.

Novello wines follow a production process unlike any other wine with a distinctive feature – fermentation by carbonic maceration.  Another great difference between Novello and “normal” wines is the low-alcohol content as whole grapes are fermented and not pressed therefore limiting the percentage of sugars converted into alcohol content (11%).

Carbonic maceration is a fascinating wine-making technique originally created back in the 1930’s by a French researcher called Flanzy.  Grape fermentation is favoured by the absence of oxygen. This contemporary method was developed throughout the Beaujolais wine region of Burgundy introducing the renowned vin primeur and vin nuoveau.

Novello wines are a perfect match with mushrooms, artichokes and of course roasted chestnuts commonly known here as “Caldarroste”

MY TASTE OF NAPLES

ROASTED CHESTNUTS  Castagne – Caldarroste

QUALITY FRUITS OF THE CAMPANIA REGION. The Campania region is not only rich in art and archaeology but offers a great range of certified agricultural products.  Following last month’s TASTE OF NAPLES – Local Fruit & Veg (Frutta e Ortaggi) the month of November and the Autumn season includes a fantastic selection of fruit – just waiting to be discovered.

 

The provinces of Avellino and Benevento are renowned for the chestnut varieties: Castagna di Montella and the Castagna di Serino.

Other typical varieties include the Castagna del prete (traditionally linked to the Christmas season), Castagna di Acerno and Marrone di Roccadaspide.

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