THE CURRENT COVID-19 SITUATION IN CAMPANIA, ITALY

JUNE 21/06/2021

 

  • MINIMUM RISK WHITE ZONES

Following various changes regarding Italy’s anti-COVID colour-coded tier system changing from high-risk red zones to orange and yellow, the Campania region (amongst others) will finally be classified as a lowest-risk white zone as of June 21st 2021.  The monitoring report was presented last Friday (June 18th 2021) after being examined by the Italian Government’s COVID-19 taskforce.  All of Italy’s regions and autonomous provinces will now be considered as low risk except for Valle d’Aosta, which is considered as moderate risk – remaining classed as a yellow zone.

The health minister Roberto Speranza signed the latest ordinance thanks to the decrease in infections.  The Campania region has recorded an incidence of infection lower than 50 for the last three weeks.  Both the proportion of Italy’s intensive-care places occupied by COVID19 patients and ordinary hospital-ward beds at a national level are currently at 6%.  No Italian region is currently placed above the critical threshold of 30%.

 

  • NIGHT-TIME CURFEW

One of the major changes when the white zone enters into force will be the end of the night-time curfew – with no restrictions regarding travel to other white zones and no time limits to return home.  Justification is not necessary if travelling nationally but specific restrictions must be respected.

 

  • EUDCC Digital COVID Certificate – GREEN PASS

If travelling throughout national territory you must be in possession of a “Green Pass”.  The “Certificazione Verde” website enables travellers to request the digital certification in English, French and German and is designed to facilitate travel.

In order to claim the Green Pass it is necessary to provide one of the following: certification of full vaccination, details of recovery from COVID19 or a recent test resulting negative.

Consult online: www.cg.gov.it / www.salute.gov.it , Pharmacies or Doctor. The certification is available in both paper and digital versions containing a QR code and is completely free of charge.

The EU Digital COVID Certificate (EUDCC) will allow travel throughout the European Union as from July 1st.

Gatherings remain prohibited and social-distancing remains necessary.

Bars and restaurants will finally be able to remain open without having to respect time restrictions.  Indoor tables are limited to 4 seated guests with the only exception of cohabitants.

 

  • FACE MASKS

The use of protective face masks remains obligatory both indoors and outdoors throughout Italy.

Following numerous debates, the Italian Government plans to drop this obligation but there are still no precise indications.

Changes are expected regarding outdoor use as of June 28th but use will still be necessary in any crowded situations, queues, public transport, bars and restaurants if not seated and indoors.

 

The Italian Higher Health Institute (ISS) president Silvio Brusaferro quoted that the infection curve has resulted amongst the lowest in the EU and many zones have no viral cases with some regions reporting cases coming from abroad.

Chief Health Minister Gianni Rezza commented that the situation is “very good, but the epidemic isn’t over yet”

MY DATES TO REMEMBER – Festa della Liberazione – APRIL 25th (1945)

 

Numerous nationwide celebrations marking days of importance take place throughout Italy as well as various regional and local holidays.

April 25th is the official annual date that commemorates the liberation of Italy by Allied troops during the Second World War 1945 – Festa della Liberazione.

This special day honours all fallen soldiers and civilian victims who lost their lives during the bitter Nazi retreat in 1945 as well as to honour the Italian Resistance.

On this day back in 1945 thousands of Italians across the nation rose in protest against the previous ruling fascists and Benito Mussolini was shot three days later.

This date marks the liberation, which began in Milan and Turin and was announced by radio, symbolically starting a historic journey that lead to the referendum (2nd June)

and then formed the Italian Republic.

By the 1st of May, Italy was finally liberated – putting an end to fascist dictatorship and five years of war.

Today, celebrations throughout Italy include public parades, festivals and shows full of Italian flags and with a chorus of the popular song of liberation: “Bella Ciao”.  This day is also commonly used to celebrate peaceful protests including social issues such as gender inequality and environmental issues but it still remains an important date to principally honour all who gave their lives.

© My Country magazine – Naples, Italy

 

DANTEDI’ 2021

700th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATING DANTE ALIGHIERI

“FATHER OF THE ITALIAN LANGUAGE”

DATES TO REMEMBER – MARCH 25th

Year 2021 marks the 700th anniversary of the death of Dante Alighieri

with an array of commemorative events programmed throughout Italy and beyond.

Today – March 25th – is “The” day – Dantedì – celebrating the medieval philosopher and poet as highlighted last year by My Country magazine when March 25th was approved as a National Day in Italy.

Dante was born in Firenze but travelled and lived in many places including Verona, Roma, Ravenna, Bologna, Forlì, Pisa and Arezzo amongst others. Dante died 700 years ago but in September; as March 25th represents the day recognised as the beginning of the so-called “journey into afterlife” as described in his poetic trilogy La Divina Commedia – the journey through the three realms of the dead – from Inferno (hell)”, Purgatorio (purgatory) to Paradiso (heaven).

This year’s fantastic Dantedì 2021 anniversary programme involves over 100 projects taking place in over 70 towns in Italy – but the programme also extends to many other countries including the U.K. and U.S.

Dantedì will host various events, digital events, exhibitions, readings and in-depth conferences taking place not only today but throughout the year.

MY Highlights

~ 80 rare drawings of Dante’s Divine Comedy La Divina Commedia – created by the 16th-century Renaissance artist Federico Zuccari – online for free by the Uffizi Gallery of Firenze.

~ “Piazza Dante. #Festivalinrete” is just one of the many interesting projects consisting of 41 Festivals regarding Italian culture through literature, poetry, science, videos and unpublished scripts

For full details see: https://beniculturali.it/dantedì   https://dantesettecento.beniculturali.it

The Italian Minister of Cultural Heritage and Tourism Dario Franceschini commented:

“Dante is the unity of Italy.  He represents the Italian language and the very idea of our country.

The celebrations of the seven-hundred years since the death of Dante Alighieri close a three-year period of initiatives made possible by a law specifically intended to commemorate three great personalities of Italian culture: Leonardo, Raphael and, this year, Dante”.

#Dantedì    #Dantedì2021   #Dante700   #Dante2021    #Dantesettecento   #PiazzaDanteFestivalinrete

My Country magazine – My Dates to Remember – March 25th – Dantedì

 

1980 IRPINIA EARTHQUAKE

WARHOL IN NAPLES – TERRAE MOTUS COLLECTION

It was November 23rd 1980 when a 90-second earthquake destroyed many lives, assets and the historic cultural heritage that struck throughout Irpinia-Basilicata (Southern Italy)

The 6.9-magnitude quake injured over 10,000 people, caused 3,000 casualties and left more than 300,000 homeless throughout the regions of Campania, Basilicata and Puglia.

Many localities in the Salerno, Avellino and Potenza provinces were nearly completely destroyed.

The strongest seismic event of the last 80 years was felt throughout Italy, including Sicily, Emilia Romagna and Liguria in the North.

 

Devastating images of the aftermath shocked people not only throughout Italy but the world.

Reports quoted that many lives could not be saved due to complicated delays

it took up to 48 hours for rescuers to reach some of the worst-hit areas.

Read more

BREXIT TRANSITION: TIME IS RUNNING OUT

Yes, time is running out so make sure you are ready

Your business, family, personal and travel circumstances will be affected by the Brexit transition.

The Withdrawal Agreement set a transition period lasting until 31 December 2020.

The British Embassy in Rome and the British Consulate General Milan are currently holding online meetings across Italy to update British citizens working and living in the country and answering their questions regarding Britain’s departure from the European Union. There are new rules (and requirements) for businesses and UK citizens from 1 January 2021

Changes for businesses and citizens

You need to act NOW if you’re:

* importing goods from the EU * exporting goods to the EU * moving goods to or from Northern Ireland *

travelling to the EU * living and working in the EU * staying in the UK if you’re an EU citizen

GUIDE ON RESIDENCY: Under the Withdrawal Agreement ratified by the European Union and the United Kingdom,

European rules on free movement will continue to apply to UK nationals and their family members through the transitional period until 31 December 2020.

The registration office (anagrafe) at the local town hall (comune) remains the competent authority for registering UK nationals.

Residency   If you are resident in Italy before the transition period ends on 31st December 2020, you will be able to stay.  You must register as an Italian resident (in Italian) if you want to stay in Italy for more than 3 months. You will get one of the following from the local town hall or comune:  an attestazione di iscrizione anagrafica or attestazione di soggiorno permanente (if resident for 5 years or more)

Read more

Remembrance Day 2020 – the date and events affected by the Covid pandemic

OK, so Remembrance Day/Remembrance Sunday will be slightly different this year – due to the general emergency situation.

Usually this November date is powered by an army of volunteers working around-the-clock to celebrate veterans, serving troops, families and the younger generations – to unite in appreciation for the fallen who fought during the two world wars.

Obviously as with many things, the 102nd Anniversary of the armistice which finally ended the First World War will be “somewhat different this year” according to the Veterans minister Mercer.

The traditional Cenotaph service will take place this year as usual at 11 am but will be closed to the public – for the first time in its century-long history.

Mel Waters, chief executive of military charity Help for Heroes, said: “Remembrance is an important time to remember the fallen, but also to remind the nation that many veterans are living with illness or injury and continue to need support.

“We are sorry to hear that the annual Cenotaph event is not going ahead, but the safety of those participating must be the priority.”

The Celebrations

The celebration known as Remembrance Sunday takes place on the second Sunday of November – closest to the 11th – as the guns of WWI fell silent on the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month in 1918 – exactly when the Armistice was signed – marking the end of years of sufferance.  From the official Armistice Day celebrations held at Buckingham Palace in 1919 this date is celebrated throughout all nations of the Commonwealth together with many nations marking the anniversary as a day of memorial.

Every year in November, the nation marks the wars that have scarred our past and the bravery of the men and women who fought them. Remembrance Sunday and Armistice Day, which fall on Sunday November 8 and Wednesday November 11 this year, offer us all a chance to remember not just those who fought, but what they fought for.

 

Read more

San Gennaro ampoule

St. Januarius  SAN GENNARO

the Saint and the Miracle…

Throughout the year the city of Naples celebrates over fifty different Saints

– but the Saint Januarius San Gennaro may be considered as the most important.

If you are new here to Naples, then the history and traditions regarding San Gennaro

together with the alleged miracle may just be worth learning about.

 

Three yearly events take place dedicated to the patron Saint San Gennaro and are not only religious celebrations but mass events which today continue to boast an enormous public participation.  The annual dates are held on the Saturday before the first Sunday of May, on September 19th and December 16th and celebrated in central Naples at the “Duomo” Cathedral of Naples, Museo del Tesoro di San Gennaro and at the Sanctuary of San Gennaro where it is believed he was beheaded – Santuario di San Gennaro all Solfatara, situated at Pozzuoli.

The traditional procession was originally established aiming to end the plague and passed from the Solfatara arriving to the Amphitheatre Anfiteatro Flavio to return to the statue of San Gennaro held within the Sanctuary.  The “miracle” has been regularly recorded since year 1389…

Regarding “the Miracle”, the faithful and not only gather in Naples to witness the mystifying liquefaction of what is claimed to San Gennaro’s blood.  Numerous legends depict that if the blood conserved within the glass ampoule fails to liquefy, then disaster will hit Naples.  Coincidentally or not, disasters have actually struck on several occasions when the liquefaction failed – including the plague epidemic that struck Pozzuoli and the earthquake dated 1980 creating over 3,000 victims.

the Museum…

The astounding museum Museum of the Treasure of Saint Gennaro – Museo del Tesoro di San Gennaro was founded in 2003 due to a project supported by European funds, by local institutions and private companies and is situated next to the Duomo of Naples.  The Treasure (il Tesoro) and vast collections of art works held within this museum covering over 700 square metres have been estimated as richer than the Crown Jewels belonging none other than to Queen Elizabeth II.  The untouched collection of works is guarded by an ancient institution – the Deputation of the Royal Chapel and Treasure of San Gennaro – which was established back in 1527 and is an organisation that still safeguards its preservation today.  Two ampoules are held within the main altar of the Royal Chapel.  The Royal Chapel is part of the Cathedral but independent.  Exhibits include jewellery, fabrics, paintings, frescoes, the renowned “mitre” –the Bishop’s hat embedded with diamonds, rubies and emeralds and a priceless collection of numerous silver busts – dating from 1305.

MUSEO DEL TESORO DI SAN GENNARO   149, via Duomo – Napoli

OPENING TIMES: Mondays to Saturdays: 9.30-5.30;  Sundays: 9.30-1.30

CONTACT:  +39 081 294980/338 3361771   info@museosangennaro.it

TICKET FEES:   Standard Euro 5; Guided Tour Euro 12;

2 Museum’sMuseo del Tesoro di San Gennaro including entrance voucher to Museo Civico Filangieri Euro 8.

View the QR code to download the museum’s multimedia guide app. without charge at the ticket office (situated at the entrance)

Online Ticket Office Info and Reservations:

+39 081 294980/ 366 1319973  prenotazioni@museosangennaro.it

Full details and any time changes will be updated with official notices on http://www.museosangennaro.it

Discover San Gennaro at:

Duomo di Napoli Cathedral Santa Maria Assunta 147, via Duomo Naples;

Santuario di San Gennaro all Solfatara 8 via San Gennaro alla Solfatara and the Catacombs Catacombe di San Gennaro 13 via Capodimonte Naples.

(For the complete article – read more on pages 8 to 11 – September 2020 edition)

 

source © My Country magazine – September 2020

Photographs courtesy: Marcello Erardi – Napoli vista attraverso gli scatti fotografici

 

Time change in Italy 29 March 2020, 02.00 One-hour Forward. The EU summertime and the Daylight Saving Time (DST) was regularly standardised in 1996 by the European Union to run forward by one-hour on the last Sunday in March and back onehour on the last Sunday in October. Apart from various trials including Double Summer Time during the Second World War and the British Summer Time GMT + 1 hour in the late 1960’s – the current clock-changing system has been in place since 1972.
The idea is believed to have begun in 1907 with a publication entitled “The Waste of Daylight” written by William Willet – who sadly died in 1915, just one year before his plan was adopted in Germany and then by the United Kingdom. The “Summer Time Act of 1916” was quickly passed by Parliament and the first day of British Summer Time on May 21st 1916 was widely reported by the press. In those years the hands on most clocks could not be turned back without breaking the mechanisms.

Daylight Saving Time (DST) starts this year on Sunday, March 29th when clocks are turned forward 1 hour from 2:00 AM to 3:00 AM

The Italian Minister of Cultural Heritage and Tourism Dario Franceschini recently announced the approval of the directive regarding March 25th as a National Day dedicated to the genial poet Dante Alighieri – entitled Dantedì.
Many events will involve scholars, students, cultural institutions and associations. More than 400 major events and numerous exhibitions are being programmed for next year’s 2021 national celebrations marking 700 years from Dante’s death, dated September 14th.
Minister Dario Franceschini commented that “Dante will be celebrated annually on March 25th – the day recognised as the start of the journey into afterlife as described in the Divine Comedy – Divina Commedia. Dante is the unity of Italy. He represents the Italian language and the very idea of our country