MARCH 09/03/2021   The colour-coded tier system was updated including higher Covid-19 restrictions last February 21st throughout Italy

Many regions changed classification from lower-risk yellow zones to medium-risk orange zones including Campania, Naples.The Campania region is currently classified as a high-risk red zone, together with Basilicata and Molise.

It is predicted that numerous regions will follow – updating from medium-risk orange to red – considered as a high level of risk with a scenario of maximum severity.

Italy’s health minister Roberto Speranza signed the recent order based upon a weekly report provided by the Higher Health Institute (ISS) involving increasing concerns about widespread circulation of new and more transmissible variants.

The latest Dpcm Ministerial Decree was signed by Speranza and the Prime Minister Draghi on March 2nd 2021 to combat and contain the virus emergency – to be respected from March 6th to April 6th 2021.
The new restrictive measures confirm numerous urgent provisions already in force for containment of contagion throughout the national territory and introduce a number of new measures.
The colour-coded tier system classifying Italy into white, yellow, orange and red zones has been confirmed and will be updated according to levels of risk.

  • Face masks are obligatory – indoors and outdoors. Children under six years of age are exempt.
  • Social-distancing of at least 1-metre is still in act.
  • The travel ban between regions is confirmed until March 27th 2021. Travel motivated by proven work requirements or health reasons is permitted as is returning to one’s residence.
  • The nationwide night-time curfew from 10 pm to 5 am has also been confirmed.
  • All schools within red zones are now closed.
  • Any form of crowding is prohibited.
  • Visiting relatives or friends or travel to second homes is NOT allowed (even within your own municipality)
  • Throughout orange and red zones catering services are suspended but take-away and delivery is permitted until 10 pm. In all areas Bars and Café’s are available for take-away services until 6 pm only.
  • Throughout red zones any retail/commercial activity is suspended except for necessary foodstuffs and Pharmacies.
  • The national State of Emergency has been extended to April 30th 2021.

Please note: Italian authorities may impose, extend or further tighten any restrictions with little-to-no-notice – in response to developments regarding the Covid-19 strain.

Rules of conduct in case of any symptoms or doubts about health conditions:
If you have any symptoms such as fever (over 37.5°), breathing difficulty or coughing – stay at home and limit all contacts.  Do NOT go to the hospital or Doctor but call your local Guardia Medica or contact the regional or toll-free numbers:
Information line from Italy 1500
From abroad +39 02 32008345/ 02 89619015
Campania region 800 90 96 99
Use the national emergency numbers 112/118 only if strictly necessary

© MY COUNTRY MAGAZINE – NAPLES, ITALY (MARCH 2021)

Latest update 09/03/2021

Latest Covid-19 situation in Italy
*updated: March 15th 2021

As expected, the health minister Speranza has signed the latest decree classifying the regions of Lazio, Lombardia, Emilia-Romagna, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Veneto, Piemonte, Puglia, Marche and the province of Trento as high-risk red zones from today March 15th 2021 (Campania and Molise remain classed as red)
The regions of Abruzzo, Calabria, Tuscania, Liguria, Puglia, Sicilia, Umbria, the Aosta valley and province of Bolzano are now classed as medium-risk orange zones. Sardegna remains categorized as the only lowest-risk white zone.
Current restrictions will remain in place until Easter weekend when the the whole country (except Sardegna) will be classed as high-risk red – even though April 3rd, 4th and 5th will supposedly include the possibility to visit relatives or friends – once per day.
Since the Covid-19 pandemic swept over Italy one year ago, over 100,000 people have died – prompting long lockdowns and forming what may be regarded as the worst recession since WWII. Tightened restrictions in force throughout red zones have also ordered all schools to close and obviously residents have been asked to leave home only for necessary reasons.

Over 6.2 million Covid-19 vaccine doses have been administered throughout Italy as of March 12th 2021. It is important to underline that two doses are necessary for the vaccine to be fully effective. So, basically just 1.9 million people in Italy can now be considered as being fully protected against the virus. Obviously this situation and various solutions with a new vaccine programme are at the top-of-the-list – and hopefully a rapid exit from the pandemic.
If you are interested about vaccine news and so much more – then why not take a look at some real details and interesting views from our friend Susan Levenstein MD – “The straight dope on Italian health and medical care” on her active blog www.stethoscopeonrome.com 

(That’s also the frequently highlighted book – Dottoressa An American Doctor in Rome)

My Country magazine

will be updating any useful current information

… for more details follow our Facebook page  www.facebook.com/paesemiomycountry

#StaySafe

 

 

THE ITALIAN ANTI-COVID COLOUR SYSTEM

Italy has adopted a three-tier system dividing the nations 20 Regions based on a colour code as follows:

RED – High risk

ORANGE – Medium risk

YELLOW – Low risk

The Campania Region is currently considered as a Yellow Zone (as of January 2021)  In Yellow zones – shops are allowed to open and restaurants and bars can serve customers until 6 pm.

Delivery/Take-away services are allowed after 6 pm.  At last, various museums and monumental complexes are gradually re-opening – many of which offering free or half-price entrance fees

(including the magnificent national archaeological museum of Naples #MANN Museo Archeologico Napoli and the enchanting Park and Museum of Capodimonte – Real Bosco e Museo di Capodimonte

 

THE LATEST JANUARY 2021 DECREE – DCPM

The Italian government has recently passed the latest decree-law including new Covid-19 containment measures with the State of Emergency extended until April 30th 2021.  Four new ordinances were signed by the Italian Minister of Health – Roberto Speranza on January 15th 2021 with measures enforced starting from January 17th.

The breakdown of the Regions are as follows:

Yellow zones: Basilicata, Campania, Molise, Trento, Sardinia, Tuscany

Orange zones:  Abruzzo, Apulia, Calabria, Emilia-Romagna, Friuli-Venezia Giulia, Lazio, Liguria, Marche, Veneto, Piedmonte

Red zones:  Bolzano, Lombardia, Sicilia

 

The main changes introduced by the new decree are as follows:

MOBILITY BETWEEN REGIONS

The decree confirms the ban already in force regarding any movements between different Regions and autonomous Provinces – with the exception of proven work requirements, health reasons or situations of necessity.

VISITING PRIVATE HOMES

A maximum of two people may travel to visit another private home once a day and between 5 am and 10 pm.  The two persons travelling may take children under 14 years of age or any disabled or dependent persons who live with them.  It is recommended to use a protective mask if non-cohabiting people are present.

INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL

Italy is maintaining extensive international travel restrictions.  Travellers from the UK have been barred from entry since December 23rd 2020 – unless they are official residents of Italy or travelling for essential reasons that must be declared in writing.  Travellers must present proof of a negative Covid-19 test result taken not other than 72 hours before departure and to take another test upon arrival in Italy.  People arriving from the UK are required to present themselves to their local health authorities in Italy and self-isolate for at least 14 days – regardless of the test results.  This requirement also applies to travellers from all EU countries and all international arrivals (except those from San Marino and the Vatican) and they must complete a self-declaration form prior to arrival.

A new ordinance has been signed on January 18th 2021 to ban flights from Brazil and against entry for those who have transited through Brazil in the last 14 days.

 

THE 3 FUNDAMENTAL RULES

To protect yourself and others from contagion

<•  Always use a mask – indoors and outdoors unless you are alone or with cohabiting persons

<•  Maintain a distance of at least one-metre from other people

<•  Wash your hands frequently with soap and water or alcohol based solutions

 

NATIONWIDE MEASURES include:

Masks MUST be worn in all outdoor and indoor public spaces (Children under six years of age are exempt)

Public transport is limited to operate with a 50-percent capacity

Any form of crowding or gatherings consisting of more than six persons are considered as prohibited

Shopping Centres will remain closed on weekends

The authorities have also confirmed the night time curfew – currently active from 10 pm to 5 am

The travel ban between regions is in act until February 15th 2021

INFO/RULES OF CONDUCT – IN CASE OF SYMPTOMS OR DOUBTS ABOUT HEALTH CONDITIONS

If you have symptoms such as fever (over 37.5°), breathing difficulty or coughing

stay at home and limit all contacts

Do NOT go to the hospital or Doctor but call your medical guard (Guardia Medica) or the regional toll-free numbers:

From Italy – 1500

From abroad – +39 02 32008345/ 02 89619015

Campania region – 800 90 96 99

Contact the emergency numbers 112 or 118 only if strictly necessary.

If you do prove to be subject to “quarantine” isolation measures by testing positive to the Covid-19 virus – then you are strictly prohibited to move from your home/residence.

For detailed information consult your local Embassy, Consulate and the Italian Health board – Ministero della Salute website – with links in English on: salute.gov.it

Please note: Italian authorities may impose, extend or further tighten any restrictions with little-to-no-notice – depending on disease activity and in response to developments regarding the Covid-19 strain

Keep an eye on the My Country magazine’s LATEST UPDATES on www.mycountrymagazine.com and follow our Facebook page on www.facebook.com/paesemiomycountry

PUBLISHED by My Country magazine, Naples- Italy January 20th 2021 – LAST UPDATE January 20th 2021

MY TASTE OF NAPLES

So, what is Vino Novello?

A SEASONAL DELIGHT

Like every year, starting from mid-October until the end of November, the so-called Italian “new” wines appear.

Vino Novello is a fresh, sparkling deep-red coloured wine with purple reflections, commonly confused with young wines or recent vintages, that is – wines that have not yet aged.

Novello wines follow a production process unlike any other wine with a distinctive feature – fermentation by carbonic maceration.  Another great difference between Novello and “normal” wines is the low-alcohol content as whole grapes are fermented and not pressed therefore limiting the percentage of sugars converted into alcohol content (11%).

Carbonic maceration is a fascinating wine-making technique originally created back in the 1930’s by a French researcher called Flanzy.  Grape fermentation is favoured by the absence of oxygen. This contemporary method was developed throughout the Beaujolais wine region of Burgundy introducing the renowned vin primeur and vin nuoveau.

Novello wines are a perfect match with mushrooms, artichokes and of course roasted chestnuts commonly known here as “Caldarroste”

MY TASTE OF NAPLES

ROASTED CHESTNUTS  Castagne – Caldarroste

QUALITY FRUITS OF THE CAMPANIA REGION. The Campania region is not only rich in art and archaeology but offers a great range of certified agricultural products.  Following last month’s TASTE OF NAPLES – Local Fruit & Veg (Frutta e Ortaggi) the month of November and the Autumn season includes a fantastic selection of fruit – just waiting to be discovered.

 

The provinces of Avellino and Benevento are renowned for the chestnut varieties: Castagna di Montella and the Castagna di Serino.

Other typical varieties include the Castagna del prete (traditionally linked to the Christmas season), Castagna di Acerno and Marrone di Roccadaspide.

Read more

MY LUCKY TRADITIONS

TRADITIONS SYMBOLS SUPERSTITIONS LUCK

The lucky horn

O’curniciell

amulet of Naples

“tuosto, stuorto e cu ‘a ponta”

Naples is a magical city full of miracles, mysteries and superstitions

– many of which have legends to tell from hundreds of years ago.

From Saints to throwing salt over your shoulder

– if you have been to Naples then you must have seen the red horn somewhere.

So, what’s it all about?

THE ORIGINS   The red horn – commonly known as o’curniciell – corniciello or simply corno – resembles a hot pepper and is an important symbol and renowned amulet of Naples – regarding both tradition and superstition – with antique origins dating back to the Middle Ages when primitives associated the physical power of animals with the emblematic size of their horns… and to when populations of hunters hang bloody horns of large prey at the entrance of their homes to ward off enemies…

Well, there’s just a few of many explanations.

Read more

CONTEMPORARY ART
SyArt Sorrento Festival
@ VILLA FIORENTINO – C.so Italia, SORRENTO
JULY 11th to SEPTEMBER 6th 2020

This year’s fourth edition of the SyArt Sorrento Festival is dedicated to contemporary art presenting forty artists from fourteen different countries. The suggestive historic location of Villa Fiorentino (frequently highlighted by My Country magazine) will host the exhibition and international meetings of contemporary art including over 100 contemporary works including painting, photography, sculpture, video art, body art, site-specific and installations. Apart from a well-represented Italy, the events also include artists from Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Egypt, England, Korea, Peru, Poland, Serbia, Slovenia and Uruguay.  Villa Fiorentino is the headquarters of the Sorrento Foundation – Fondazione Sorrento.
The itinerary covers an area distributed on three floors and eight halls. Numerous works were created specifically for the Festival during the recent Lockdown period and will be on show to the public for the first time. Entrance to the exhibition is without charge.
Artists: Fabio Imperiale – Maria Rosaria Stigliano – Erhan Us – Catherine Chasanaglou – Hayoung Jung – Franco Paternostro – Heather Simone – Maria Teresa Majello – Sonia Gil – Marco Stefanucci – Giulia Spernazza – Maria Lorek – Giuliano Giuliani – Mark Cattaneo – Emanuel Zoncato – Matteo Ponzi – Andrea De Souza Rocha – Stefano Parisio Perrotti – Alessandro Rillo – Simone Riccardi – Federica La Magra – Milan Markovic – Nico Vigenti – Enrico Giulia – Victoria Dael – Robert Hromec – Tiziana Rinaldi Giacometti – Valentina Sorrentino – Maria Pia Daidone – Valentina Porcelli – Alessandra Carloni – Tina Sgrò – Michael Vandorpe – Elvira Carrasco – Sebastian Ceballos – Tamer Ragab – Massimo Barlettani – Nicolas Lopez – Fabio Sironi – Kristina Pirkovic

OPENING TIMES: Daily from 10 am to 1 pm and from 5 pm to 9 pm
ENTRANCE: 53, Corso Italia – Sorrento, Napoli
INFO: +39 081 8782284 (Fondazione Sorrento) – www.syart.it – info@syart.it

FUNDS FOR ANTI-COVID19 RESEARCH
Visitors to this exhibition will have the opportunity to support the research for the vaccine, an activity that places the National Cancer Institute – Irccs Fondazione Pascale in Naples at the forefront. Those who are willing can leave their offer inside a large urn positioned at the entrance of Villa Fiorentino. All proceeds from the fundraiser will be delivered together with the pictorial work “World Art for Covid” created for the occasion by various artists present at the Festival and displayed throughout the departments of the hospital – Istituto Pascale di Napoli.

Un aiuto concreto nella lotta al Covid-19 – I visitatori dell’esposizione avranno modo di sostenere la ricerca del vaccino, attività che vede in prima linea l’Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori – Irccs Fondazione Pascale di Napoli. Chi vuole può lasciare la propria offerta all’interno di una grande urna posizionata all’ingresso di Villa Fiorentino. Il ricavato della raccolta fondi sarà consegnato insieme all’opera pittorica “World Art for Covid” realizzata per l’occasione da alcuni degli artisti presenti al Festival che sarà affissa nei reparti dell’Istituto Pascale di Napoli.

Source © My Country magazine – August 2020 (page 7)

Latest on Covid-19 (Campania, Napoli)

Face Mask Regulations
The Campania region declared the obligatory use of protective face masks starting from April 10th 2020.
Well, after two long months these regulations are easing but regarding outdoor use only. In fact, masks are no longer obligatory (but optional) for outdoor use starting from June 22nd 2020. As for wherever social distancing of at least 1 metre proves impossible and for indoor use – such as public transport, shops, supermarkets etc., use will still be necessary until further notice.
Social distancing is still required. Stay Safe!

The epidemiologist Doc. Angelo D’Argenzio recently commented: “I believe as a technician that it would be preferable to continue to use protective face masks even without obligation, to maintain social distancing and avoid any gatherings. This is an appeal to each personal conscience and the respect for others. It will only be when the Campania region results with zero infections for at least two consecutive weeks that we can start the next phase, but cautiously. Cases are still registering throughout the world and so this situation must be faced until we create an effective vaccine. Our behaviour must change until then as Covid-19 has shown an extremely high contagious index and is fully capable of spreading rapidly. We must continue to be carefully aware“.

The regional president Vincenzo De Luca commented as he presented the latest ordinance: Even though it is no longer mandatory to wear masks on the streets caution will still be necessary however in all closed areas.
This does NOT mean we can “party” every day and that it’s all over… De Luca has in fact gained a great number of fans and social followers during these last few months – thanks to his critical, frequently comical but at the same time clearly annoyed comments duringthe Lockdown stage. De Luca was also frequently portrayed as a Superhero!
The Campania region is currently focusing on smart working and the resumption of normal working activities – obviously in compliance with all anti-Covid safety standards.
Changes are also on the way regarding contact/group sports but as for restrictions regarding the so-called “Movida – By Night” situation, the ordinance will be revised on June 30th.

Many have seized the chance to return to the sands, soak up the sun and take a swim. But social distancing? Maybe, maybe not.

GIUGLIANO IN CAMPANIA, Italy – The lifeguard turned his back to the water and looked for danger on the sand. All around him at the beach club west of Naples, children on their stomachs dug moats while adults reclined on beach chairs, catching rays, eating stuffed shells and reconnecting with friends on the first Sunday back at the beach after a monthslong lockdown. Some maintained the new social-distancing restrictions. Some did not.
As the temperatures rise, sun-starved Europeans are desperate to get to the beach and tourism-starved Mediterranean countries are desperate to have them. In Greece, the government is trying to negotiate an “air bridge” from Britain, with promises of 40 bathers per 1,000 square meters and disinfected chairs. The Spanish are trying to convince Germany to send tourists their way, while Baltic Sea resorts, which had a far less severe epidemic than Spain, are trying to poach them.
But it is Italy, which endured one of Europe’s worst outbreaks, that is most counting on the economically restorative powers of its beaches and seas. Tourism accounts for 13 percent of Italy’s gross domestic product, and 40 percent of that is from beach activity. Officials and beach club owners have expressed hope that foreign tourists will spend time and money in their country when the borders reopen in June. But in the meantime, it is the Italians who must pick up the sunbathing slack.
On May 18, the national government, citing the dipping curve ofinfections, allowed Italian regions to reopen beach clubs. Different regions have reacted with varying degrees of caution. Tuscany allowed them to reopen on May 18, Campania on May 23, Lazio on May 29, and Sicily on June 6. But the national government also said that any sharp rise in new infections would prompt another lockdown, and the mayor of one small town in the southern region of Puglia closed the beaches this week after seeing an “invasion” of sunbathers, many, he said, “wearing their masks as necklaces.” Italians have been waiting to get back to the beach for months and have obsessed over their summer prospects essentially since the lockdown began in March.
In the Italian news media, detailed graphics and videos regularly illustrated the possible restrictions and proposed bathing innovations.
There were the rows of plexiglass cubicles – each holding an umbrella and recliners, or entry gates that sprayed disinfectant on bathers like cars entering a carwash, or a village of eco-friendly bamboo and fabric beach huts. (“We were in Mongolia for many years,” the architect explained.) None caught on.
Salvatore Trinchillo, the third-generation owner of the Lido Varca d’Oro club in Giugliano in Campania, said that the plexiglass cubes were only ever promoted by “a guy who makes plexiglass” and would “turn sunbathers into rotisserie chickens.” Instead, Mr. Trinchillo, who is also the vice president of Italy’s union of beach club presidents, opted for more traditional arrangements, with more room between the umbrellas and lounge chairs. The people around the pasta and coffee bars wore masks and those who wanted to eat in the outdoor restaurant had their foreheads scanned with a thermometer.
Campania’s latest measures were adopted once again when Vincenzo De Luca, the governor, perhaps best known during the coronavirus outbreak for threatening to take a “blowtorch” to illegal gatherings and for calling his citizens “doubly imbeciles” for bothering to wear masks but then letting them hang around their necks, decided that infections had gone down enough for beach clubs to open. The region also allowed bathers to remove their masks on the beach, as long as they observed social-distancing measures.
One client described herself as a year-round beach enthusiast.
And she said that after months of going stir crazy in her nearby home, the opening of the beaches and the ability to stare out at the hazy island of Ischia was “a mercy from God.” “We all got fat!” she added, referring to the “quarantine kilos” she said she had put on. Mr. Trinchillo agreed that “everyone is a little chubbier” and said through a mask that he was delighted to finally see people back on the beach. To observe social-distancing measures, he had to reduce his beach-chair capacity to 1,200 from 2,000. He also created broader corridors for people to pass through and spaced his chairs out even more than required by the region.
Yet there remained a dense and vibrant forest of orange umbrellas.
As he took it in, Mr. Trinchillo said more exclusive and expensive beach clubs in the region, such as on the Amalfi Coast or on the island of Capri, spots known for their crystalline waters, coves and rocky cliffs, “were now jealous of us” because they lacked the space for proper distancing and could not open. “Life is bizarre,” he said. At the Lido Varca d’Oro, people didn’t seem so few or far away. A toddler with goggles and a face mask the colors of the Italian flag scampered into the sea, next to a circle of adults with their bare faces pointed up at the sun.
Since Italy eased its lockdown, the country’s mayors have wrestled with crowds drawn to newly reopened bars, but also to its boardwalks and beaches. At the beach on Sunday, policing duties often fell to the club’s staff “I ask people if they are relatives or friends,” said one of the club employees. He said that people were generally behaving then he turned and excused himself. “See over there? I have to go and remind them that assemblies are banned.”
He walked toward the part of the beach where two cousins from Naples were spending the afternoon sun bathing with small children playing in the sand.
“Feel this air, smell the sea, it’s safer out here.. It’s freedom”

Original Text Source: New York Times International Edition
Published: May 27, 2020
Full reportage by: Jason Horowitz

Source © My Country magazine – Naples, Italy  (JULY 2020 PAGE 4)